Robert Clay Allison (Nonfiction) James S. Peters (Sunstone Press, $24.95), Softcover.

James S. Peters
James S. Peters

This book is called a “work of creative nonfiction,” but I was not impressed. Clay Allison, certainly one of the more renown shootists of his day, deserves better fare than this talky narrative. The endless dialogue is distracting with its use of modern-day vernacular and street slang, and the historical events of Allison’s career are clouded by all the invented filler text. The book does contain several Allison-related photographs, but they do little to qualify the work for any serious consideration as authentic history.

What do you think?